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Nuclei in the Cosmos XVI 2021 Dec 30, 2020 11:00 PM Chengdu, China,
Virtual RAS meeting: Progress in Astrophysics with Type-Ia Supernovae Nov 13, 2020 12:00 AM online,
Type Ia Supernovae (hereafter SNIa) play a crucial role in (Astro)physics since they can be used as standardised candles to measure large distances in the Universe. Their key contribution to distance measurement and cosmology was recognised with a Nobel Prize in Physics in 2011, and more recently in 2019 they were fundamental in re-opening the debate around the expansion of the Universe. In addition, SNIa are fundamental contributors to the chemical evolution of our Galaxy, being responsible for about 2/3 of the total iron-peak elements content, about 1/3 of the so-called “alpha elements” (in particular Si, S, Ar, Ca, and Ti), and possibly to a significant portion of heavy trans-iron proton-rich isotopes called p-nuclei. Despite the importance of SNIa, we still do not know what stellar evolution path represents their dominant progenitor channel, being a matter of debate between different kinds of accreting carbon-oxygen white dwarfs in binary systems (single-degenerate scenario) or white dwarfs merger events (double-degenerate scenario). Moreover, as light-curves, spectra and nucleosynthesis products are deeply impacted by the nature of the stellar system originating the explosion, large uncertainties are thus introduced when it comes to use SNIa in many Astrophysics fields, in particular cosmology and chemical evolution of the Galaxy. Several observables can be used to shed light on SNIa progenitors. Specific chemical abundances in the Solar System, like manganese, are only produced efficiently enough in near Chandrasekhar-mass (~1.39 solar masses) exploding white dwarfs (naturally forming in the single-degenerate scenario). Additionally, the detection of ultraviolet radiation (efficiently emitted by hot accreting white dwarfs in binary systems), chemical analysis of meteorites and gamma-ray spectroscopy provide a rich variety of astronomy to boost our understanding of SNIa progenitors. Investigation tools range from numerical models, astronomical observations, and laboratory experiments to derive material compositions and nuclear reaction rates. The aim of this Specialist Discussion meeting is to bring together researchers from all these different fields to promote interaction, networking and discuss strategies to progress our knowledge of these crucial astrophysical events.
NAM 2019 session: Bridging the Disciplines of Galactic and Extragalactic Archaeology from Jul 01, 2019 12:00 AM to Jul 02, 2019 12:00 AM Lancaster,
Elemental abundances in stars and ISM provide stringent constraints on galaxy formation and evolution. This has mostly been used to study our Galaxy through "Galactic Archaeology''. Estimating elemental abundances within external galaxies is more challenging, but current and future observations (e.g. JWST) enable "Extra-galactic Archaeology''. In this interdisciplinary session, we bring together all experts necessary for this quest, linking nuclear physics, stellar evolution, supernova physics, nucleosynthesis, Galactic chemical evolution, observations of early- and late-type galaxies, and cosmological simulations.
Stars, Supernovae and Nucleosynthesis V: 20-21 September 2018 from Sep 20, 2018 09:00 AM to Sep 21, 2018 03:00 PM University of Hull, Hull, UK,
Fifth BRIDGCE annual meeting: 2-day meeting on nuclear astrophysics, massive stars and supernovae. Topics that will be covered during the meeting are: Nuclear Astrophysics; Astronomical Observations and Galactic Chemical Evolution; Stellar abundances: a direct probe of nuclear reactions in stars; Stellar Evolution and nucleosynthesis; Nuclear data needs for stellar nucleosynthesis.
Stars, Supernovae and Nucleosynthesis IV: 4-5 September 2017 from Sep 04, 2017 09:00 AM to Sep 05, 2017 05:00 PM School of Physics & Astronomy, The University of Edinburgh, James Clerk Maxwell Building, Peter Guthrie Tait Road, Edinburgh, EH9 3FD, UK,
Third BRIDGCE annual meeting: A 2-day meeting on nuclear astrophysics. This meeting is supported by the STFC, the Institute of Physics and the University of Edinburgh.
NAM 2017 session: Galactic Chemical Evolution, Stars, and the Creation of Elements in the Big-Data Era Jul 04, 2017 12:00 AM Hull,
The life and death cycle of the stars is key to our understanding of the creation of the elements and the ongoing chemical evolution of our Galaxy. In this new era of big data and large scale spectroscopic surveys (Gaia, APOGEE, Gaia-ESO, WEAVE), we are now obtaining the large galactic chemical datasets needed to truly characterise the stellar populations within the Milky Way and also within other galaxies using key facilities such as ALMA. The three fields we seek to bridge are: 1) the properties of nuclei, nuclear reaction rates and nucleosynthesis pathways; 2) stellar structure, evolution and element nucleosynthesis; and 3) observation and modelling of the chemodynamical evolution of galaxies. Advancing the underlying physics of these fields and improving the key measurements that are passed between them provides the framework upon which the analyses of large chemical datasets are based. It is essential that these fields are kept at the forefront and kept in close communication to maximise the exploitation of these impressive observational datasets. This interdisciplinary session is proposed by the BRIDGCE UK network (BRIdging the Disciplines of Galactic Chemical Evolution, www.bridgce.ac.uk) which transfers knowledge and develops synergies between the UK researchers investigating the origin of the elements and the evolution of the stars and galaxies. The latest advancements in these fields will be presented and considered in the context of the big data observational programmes of stellar population chemical distributions both within the Milky Way and within galaxies at high redshift.
Stars, Supernovae and Nucleosynthesis III: 7-8 September 2016 from Sep 07, 2016 09:00 AM to Sep 08, 2016 05:00 PM Lennard-Jones Laboratories, 1.25, Keele University,
Third BRIDGCE annual meeting: 2-day meeting on nuclear astrophysics, massive stars and supernovae Wednesday 7 September: Stars and Supernovae Thursday 8 September: GCE, Meteoritic Grains and Nuclear Astrophysics; This meeting is supported by the ERC starting grant no 306901
NAM 2016 session: The Building Blocks of Galactic Chemical Evolution Jun 30, 2016 12:00 AM Nottingham,
This aim of this session is to bring together experts from different disciplines, including galactic dynamics, galactic chemical evolution, stellar evolution, nucleosynthesis, observations of stellar abundances and nuclear astrophysics, and answer a key question like how the elements were made in the universe, and how they evolve. The BRIDGCE network (BRIdging the Disciplines of Galactic Chemical Evolution) aims to facilitate knowledge transfer and develop synergies between the UK researchers involved in the study of the origin of the elements. This is an open session to all researchers that are working in these disciplines or want to know more about this field of research. Contributions from early career researchers are particularly encouraged.
Stars, Supernovae and Nucleosynthesis II: 16-17 September 2015 from Sep 16, 2015 09:00 AM to Sep 17, 2015 05:00 PM Lennard-Jones Laboratories, 1.25, Keele University,
Second BRIDGCE annual meeting: 2-day meeting on nuclear astrophysics, massive stars and supernovae Wednesday 16 September: Stars and Supernovae Thursday 17 September: GCE, Meteoritic Grains and Nuclear Astrophysics; This meeting is supported by the ERC starting grant no 306901
NAM 2015 Session: Galactic Chemical Evolution in the Gaia Era Jul 06, 2015 from 04:30 PM to 10:00 AM United Kingdom,
Galactic Chemical Evolution in the Gaia Era parallel session at the National Astronomy meeting 2015
Nuclear Physics in Astrophysics VII from May 18, 2015 09:00 AM to May 22, 2015 05:00 PM
The seventh edition of the Nuclear Physics in Astrophysics Conference will be held from 18 to 22 May 2015 in York, United Kingdom, and is jointly organised by the Universities of Edinburgh and York.
IoP meeting on Nuclear physics and r-process nucleosynthesis May 15, 2015 from 09:00 AM to 05:00 PM School of Physics and Astronomy, at the King's Building campus of the University of Edinburgh,
IoP meeting on r process in Edinburgh
Stars, Supernovae and Nucleosynthesis 2014 from Sep 16, 2014 10:00 AM to Sep 17, 2014 05:00 PM Lennard-Jones Laboratories, 1.25, Keele University,
2-day meeting on nuclear astrophysics, massive stars and supernovae Tuesday 16 September: Stars and Supernovae Wednesday 17 September: GCE, Meteoritic Grains and Nuclear Astrophysics; This meeting is supported by the ERC starting grant no 306901
INT workshop: Nucleosynthesis and Chemical Evolution: Recent Progress and Future Directions from Jul 28, 2014 12:55 PM to Aug 29, 2014 12:55 PM Institute for Nuclear Theory, Room C411 Physics/Astronomy Building, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195-1550,
INT Program INT-14-2b, July 28 - August 29, 2014
Nulceosynthesis in AGB Stars from Jul 14, 2014 09:00 AM to Jul 18, 2014 05:00 PM Bad Honnef,
The 568. Wilhelm und Else Heraeus-Seminar will be held from July 14th to 18th at the Physikzentrum in Bad Honnef.
Nuclei in the Cosmos 2014 from Jul 07, 2014 11:05 AM to Jul 11, 2014 11:05 AM Debrecen, Hungary,
Major bi-annual conference of nuclear physicists, astrophysicists and cosmochemists.
Nucleosynthesis – origins and impacts Feb 14, 2014 from 10:30 AM to 03:30 PM The Royal Astronomical Society, Burlington House, Piccadilly, LONDON, W1J 0BQ,
RAS Specialist Discussion Meeting organised by Dr Alex Murphy (Edinburgh)* and Professor Sean Ryan (Hertfordshire)